Hot Prospecting

I had no work booked for the day, so I planned to wake up early and head out to my new spot and see what happened.  But first I had to replace my home made drywasher’s fan bearing, despite it being a “sealed bearing”!  I also had to service some of the hardware on the riffle box, due to all the shakin’, rattlin’ & rollin’ it has been doing this year.

Because we in Lake Havasu are now in the 100′s from now until late September, one needs to start digging around 6 am to have enough time to dig before it gets too hot.  This time of year, the early morning temps are still in the upper 70′s, so until that changes, (morning temps will eventually only get down into the 90′s), I’ll keep digging.

desert prospecting is hot and dusty

Dusty and hot!

The only issue I have in my current new spot, which is atop a series of gullies, fully exposed to gusty wind, is when the wind does start blowing from random directions, the dust from my drywasher sometimes blows right in my direction.  When I’m digging and sweating, the windblown dust sticks to any exposed skin.  In a matter of minutes, you have a caked-on layer of dirt!  So far this new spot has yielded over 2 grams of placer gold and even a few nice pickers, which have been pretty scarce this season.  So the price I pay (hot, sweaty, dusty, etc) is almost worth it…almost.  Spending on average 4-5 hours digging gold and coming back with an average of 2-3 tenths of a gram really does not constitute being worthwhile, but, as any placer gold prospector can attest, you never know when you’re going to find a nugget.

Sweaty and dusty placer gold prospecting

Sweaty and dusty

Maybe today will be that day?

As the morning  progressed, I did my usual routine, which entails processing about 8 – 10 buckets of dirt from more than location in my current gully, then walking the bucket of concentrates down the hill to my little base-camp, where my ice-filled cooler of Powerade, and water await, as well as my pan and tub of water. After digging and drywashing for an hour stretch up in the gully, in the hot desert sun, I like to turn on the stereo in my Samurai and pan to the music!  The first couple washouts yielded the normal multiple bits of flour gold per pan, which isn’t a bad thing, but you always think that the next pan will have one of those elusive little pickers that we all desire!

Since I’ve visited this new spot about half a dozen times so far, I had only found one nice picker amongst the normal bunch of fines, so I realized that finding more would be rare.   These trips are really noting more than filler trips, where I intend only to add to my total of gold.  During the third washout round, there it was, voila, a nice picker poked its head out of the black sand in the pan.

Another nice picker

Another nice picker

Finally!  Finding this new picker was a good boost to my ego as well as my motivation to continue on as the morning advanced near the noon hour, in which the sun is at its peak, bringing with it 100+ degree temperatures!  I had one bottle of Powerade left and with renewed motivation, I trudged back up the hill for the 5th and final time of the morning, in search of another picker.  I convinced myself to dig up more buckets of pay dirt than usual to finish off a productive day with hopefully more pickers.  The effort did indeed payoff, rewarding me with two more pickers!  Not as large as the first one, but they made my sweaty, dust-caked face smile.  the day ended up producing 3+ tenths of a gram.  With the price of gold falling below $1400.00 per ounce, not many reasonable humans would consider that total worth the extreme effort, but to anyone bitten by the Gold Bug, such as I have been, this is a good day!

Today as I write this, our temps topped 110 degrees in Lake Havasu, AZ, and my boat lettering business, Don Burda Design has increased, so I’m not sure how many more posts I’ll be able to write until things cool off a bit.  I can guarantee that in the last few outings of the season, I find something to brag about, you’ll see it posted here!

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